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Historical Origins of English Words and Phrases

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truce [Jun. 22nd, 2008|09:51 pm]
Historical Origins of English Words and Phrases

word_ancestry

[gwoman]
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[Current Mood |groggygroggy]

truce, n. [troos, trōōs]
A cessation or suspension of hostilities between two or more warring parties for a specified period of time, truce is first recorded in Middle English as triws. This spelling was a variation of Middle English trewes, the plural of trewe 'faith, assurance of fait, covenant, treaty.' Trewes was gradually converted into a singular noun because it was used to describe as a unit the agreements or promises of good faith pledged among parties in a dispute. Its predecessor was Old English treow 'faith, pledge' (see English true), derived from proto-Germanic trewwo. This early word is believed to be a descendant of prehistoric Indo-European base deru-. Old English treow is cognate with Old Frisian triuwe, Old Saxon treuwaMiddle Dutch trouwe, Dutch trouw, Old High German triuwa, German Treue, Gothic triggwa, Old Icelandic tru, and Danish and Swedish tro. French trève and Italian treuga are related to this Germanic family of words because the Germanic form was adopted into Late Latin and transferred to the Romance languages.


Side note:
Last time I used one of these sources, it was correct for everything except the modern Nordic languages. Any native speakers, please let me know if I'm using the incorrect Danish or Swedish words. Thanks :)
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Comments:
[User Picture]From: nighteevee
2008-06-23 07:33 am (UTC)
Seeing as tro/tru is the word in Norwegian, I have a severely hard time imagining it should be different in Swedish and Danish :)
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From: nerak_rose
2008-06-23 08:59 am (UTC)
They're correct. ;) also the Old Icelandic word.
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[User Picture]From: gwoman
2008-06-23 04:17 pm (UTC)
hooray! thanks to you both.
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[User Picture]From: naurring
2008-06-23 09:03 am (UTC)
Another word that came to my mind I'd like to see: whore. Perhaps it's just me not being a native speaker, but for me the way you write the word and the way you pronounce it don't fit. I'd love to know why.
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[User Picture]From: gwoman
2008-06-23 04:25 pm (UTC)
good question! as soon as i get home, i'll add that to the list :)
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[User Picture]From: pipetti
2008-06-23 12:24 pm (UTC)
I like seeing a word of peace in so many different languages. Makes me wonder if there are any languages that have no word for it. (Other than perhaps Klingon)

Please don't hurt me.
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[User Picture]From: gwoman
2008-06-23 04:19 pm (UTC)
LOL i bet you're right! i wish i was more hardcore of a trekkie, then i would have a klingon-english dictionary and look at up.
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[User Picture]From: oniyuri
2008-06-24 08:22 pm (UTC)
hey i don't know if you take request but i been trying to figure out why they call a baby with white-blond hair tow-headed.
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[User Picture]From: gwoman
2008-06-25 02:04 am (UTC)
that's a good question. added to the list! and please feel free to request words or phrases anytime you want - the list is huge so it'll take time for me to get to them, but i promise i will. :)
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[User Picture]From: lapiskelinia
2008-06-27 09:37 pm (UTC)

"Last time I used one of these sources"

Which sources are these, if I may? I am just wondering in case I have the urge to look up a word on my own!
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[User Picture]From: lapiskelinia
2008-06-27 09:37 pm (UTC)

Re: "Last time I used one of these sources"

Beautiful work, btw. I only just recently joined, but this journal is a real gem to an amateur like myself.
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From: oldbob
2008-07-22 05:41 am (UTC)

spitten

Spitten, perhaps a euphemism for conceived.
My father once told my sister that she had
not even been a "spit and a promise" referring
to an event that happened before she was born.
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